Updated 5/29/2020: Included with Newcomb page numbers.
This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment):Swickard woods

It is on pages 30,31 in Newcombe's Wildflowers.

Common name: Common Blue Violet 

Scientific name:Viola papilionacea

Corolla:  number of petals 5 Separate

Calyx:  number of sepals 2

Adroecium: number of stamens 2 fused

Gynoecium type: unicarpus

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic

Additional distinctive features: Purple petals that turn white with blue stripes the closer they get to the plants ovary

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Swickard Woods

It is on page 280,281 in Newcombe's Wildflowers.

Common name: Wild Geranium

Scientific name: Geranium maculatum

Corolla:  number of petals 5 separate
Calyx:  number of sepals 5 separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 8

Gynoecium type: Syncarpous

Flower type/ovary position:perigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic

Additional distinctive features: The flower is easily discernible by looking at the different compartmentalization going on from a downward view of the ovary.

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This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Swickard woods

It is on page 232,233 in Newcombe's Wildflowers.
Common name: White Avens  

Scientific name: Geum canadense

Corolla:  number of petals 5 separate

Calyx:  number of sepals 5 separate

Adroecium: number of stamens A lot, you count them;)... over 20!(separate)

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, because of the big'ol fat ovary right there in the middle that is covered by stamens. There doesn't appear to be any compartmentalization of the ovary in question, which leads to unicarpellate.

Flower type/ovary position: perigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic

Additional distinctive features: the grossy excess number of stamens and the star shape of this individual led me to the conclusion of White Avens fairly fast

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Swickard woods

It is on page 426 in Newcombe's Wildflowers. 

Common name:Clustered Black Snakeroot

Scientific name: Sanicle marilandica

Corolla:  number of petals 5 separate

Calyx:  number of sepals 5 separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 5 separate, attached seemingly at the tip of the petals. The picture shown does not show the plant in question during its "flowering time"

Gynoecium type: Apocarpous, look at it, it looks like corona if the Carpels were crowns and the plant were a virus;). That is how I knew.

Flower type/ovary position: epigynous

Flower symmetry: zygomorphic 

Additional distinctive features: This one was troubling and I wanted to call it Pacific waterleaf, but the absence of thistles ultimately led me to the conclusion. 

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This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Swickard woods

It is on page 230 in Newcombe's Wildflowers. 

Common name: Tall Cinquefoil  

Scientific name: Potentilla arguta

Corolla:  number of petals 5 separate
Calyx:  number of sepals 5 separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 5 separate, palmately spread

Gynoecium type: Apocarpus

Flower type/ovary position: 

Flower symmetry: zygomorphic 

Additional distinctive features: The flowers have yet to bloom on these individuals, the tiny thistles led me to the conclusion very quickly.

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This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Oak Grove

It is on page 58,59 in Newcombe's Wildflowers. 

Common name: Black Medick

Scientific name: Medicago lupulina

Corolla:  number of petals 3 fused

Calyx:  number of sepals 4 separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 10 separate

Gynoecium type: apocarpous, The large number of carpels led me to this.

Flower type/ovary position: epigynous

Flower symmetry: zygomorphic

Additional distinctive features: Appeared to be similar in structure to  pacific waterleaf, and clustered black snakeroot. but its differences were in its flower color and in its size, black medicks being much smaller than the previously mentioned.

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Oak Grove

It is on page 334,335 in Newcombe's Wildflowers. 

Common name: Star-of-Bethlehem  

Scientific name: Ornithogalum umbellatum

Corolla:  number of petals 6 separate
Calyx:  number of sepals 6 separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 6 separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, one singular non partitioned ovary.

Flower type/ovary position: epigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic

Additional distinctive features: This little beauty is POISONOUS!!! Cool.

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This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Oak Grove

It is on page 380,381 in Newcombe's Wildflowers. 

Common name: Oxeye Daisy

Scientific name: Chrysanthemum leucanthemum

Corolla:  number of petals 30ish separate

Calyx:  number of sepals 2 separate, wayyyyy far away from the flower

Adroecium: number of stamens 5 separate

Gynoecium type: syncarpous, 2 fused carpels

Flower type/ovary position: epigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic 

Additional distinctive features: This plant is also toxic to humans but at a much lower level than the Star-of-Bethlehem. continuous ingestion of this species will lead to the poisoning of the individual.