After learning about the different fruits of plants and the eight most common flower families (Apiaceae, Rosaceae, Liliaceae, Lamiaceae, Ranunculaceae, Asteraceae, Brassicaceae, and Fabaceae) in Ohio, I went out into the world to discover them for myself. I had a fun experience going on a field trip to Darby Creek and Cedar Bog where some of these fruits and flowers were found. It was very interesting to learn about Ohio’s natural landscape and geography and how this affects plant growth and a plant’s preference to grow there. I also looked around Glen Echo Ravine, OSU wetlands, and Scioto Audubon Metro Park for the rest of the fruits and flowers I did not find on the field trip. I found seven different kinds of fruits and six of the eight flowering plant families.

A capsule consists of 2 of more carpels that split in different ways along partitions between carpels.

 

An achene is a fruit that has a seen attached to surrounding pericarp only at the base. The aster family has fruit like this. The flower inflorescence is racem with indeterminate growth.

 

An achene is a fruit that has a seen attached to surrounding pericarp only at the base. The aster family has fruit like this.

 

An achene is a fruit that has a seen attached to surrounding pericarp only at the base. The aster family has fruit like this.

 

A nut is like an achene, but it is larger with a thick hard pericarp. The flower inflorescence is a many flowered catkin with indeterminate growth.

 

This milkweed produces follicle fruit. The follicle fruit are unicarpellate which splits down one side, releasing the seeds. The flower inflorescence are tight clusters in umbels.

 

This milkweed produces follicle fruit. The follicle fruit are unicarpellate which splits down one side, releasing the seeds. The flower inflorescence are tight clusters in umbels.

 

This milkweed produces follicle fruit. The follicle fruit are unicarpellate which splits down one side, releasing the seeds. The flower inflorescence are tight clusters in umbels.

 

This milkweed produces follicle fruit. The follicle fruit are unicarpellate which splits down one side, releasing the seeds. The flower inflorescence are tight clusters in umbels.

 

This cat tail is another example of a follicle.

 

This tree produces samara. Samara are like achenes but with wings. This is helpful in wind dispersal of the seed.

 

This tree produces samara. Samara are like achenes but with wings. This is helpful in wind dispersal of the seed.

 

This red bud tree produces legume fruit. Legumes are unicarpellate that split along two sides. These fruit are most commonly found in the fabaceae family (peas). The flower inflorescence grows clustered umbels.

 

This red bud tree produces legume fruit. Legumes are unicarpellate that split along two sides. These fruit are most commonly found in the fabaceae family (peas).

 

This spice bush produces fruits known as drupes. A drupe is a single seed that is enclosed in a hard bony endocarp. The flower inflorescence are tight clusters in umbels.

 

This spice bush produces fruits known as drupes. A drupe is a single seed that is enclosed in a hard bony endocarp. The flower inflorescence are tight clusters in umbels.

 

This turkeyfoot grass produces seeds that are grains. A grain has an exocarp tightly adherent to the seed. These seeds can be found in the grass family. The flower inflorescence grows in spikelets and has indeterminate growth.

 

This turkeyfoot grass produces seeds that are grains. A grain has an exocarp tightly adherent to the seed. These seeds can be found in the grass family. The flower inflorescence grows in spikelets and has indeterminate growth.

 

Queen Anne’s Lace or Wild Carrot(Daucus carota)
Apiaceae Family (Parsley) Stem covered with bristly hairs; bracts beneath the umbel deeply and narrowly lobed. Usually one purple floret in the center. Queen Anne’s Lace has many flowers with determinate growth (old flowers on tip). The flowers are actinomorphic (radial), not elongated and have an umbel inflorescence with five regular parts. These parts include a calyx of five separate sepals, a corolla of five separate petals, androecium of five stamens, and a inferior ovary with a gynoecium of 2 fused carpels.

 

Swamp Thistle (Cirsium muticum)
Asteraceae Family (Aster) The aster family is really a capitulum of many florets. Base of flower head cobwebby with fine white hairs; grows in wet swampy places, (found at Cedar Bog). This flower has radial symmetry with a solitary apical inflorescent type. The flower has a corolla of a 5 fused petals, an androecium of 5 fused stamen by the anthers, and an inferior gynoecium that is bicarpellate.

 

Stiff Goldenrod (S. ridiga)
Asteraceae Family (Aster)The aster family is really a capitulum of many florets. Leaves oval or oblong, rough. Lower leavers obscurely toothed or entire. Flower heads large for a golden rod. Found at Darby Creek. This flower has radial symmetry with a corymb inflorescence type. The flower has a corolla of a 5 fused petals, an androecium of 5 fused stamen by the anthers, and an inferior gynoecium that is bicarpellate.

 

Shrubby Cinquefoil Rose (Potentilla fruticosa) Rosaceae Family (Rose)
Yellow flowers. Found at Cedar Bog. This flower has a apical solitary inflorescence. The parts of the flower include a zygomorphic calyx of 5 separate sepals, corolla of 5 fused petals, and an androecium of many stamen, all united into a hypanthium, and a superior ovary with many carpels.

 

False Dragonhead or Obedient Plant (Physostegia virginiana)
Lamiaceae Family (Mint)
Pale-purple or rose flowers in spikes; flowers stay obediently for a time in whatever position they are placed. Found at Scioto Audubon Metro Park boat ramp. This flower has a spike inflorescence with indeterminate growth. The flower parts include a calyx with 5 fused sepals, a zygomorphic corolla of 5 fused petals, an androecium of two stamen or 4 stamen in which 2 are in one set and 2 in another, and a superior gynoecium with 2 carpels.

 

Yellow Vetchling or Yellow Pea (L. pratensis)
Fabaceae Family (Pea)
Bright-yellow flowers. Found at OSU wetland prairie. This flower is in a axillary cluster. The flowers parts include a calyx of 5 sepals, a zygomorphic corolla of 2 fused petals (banner), 1 separate petal (keel), and 2 separate petals (wings), an androecium of 9 stamen joined by their filaments with 1 stamen free, and a superior ovary with a unicarpellate gynoecium.

 

Yellow Vetchling or Yellow Pea (L. pratensis)
Fabaceae Family (Pea)
Bright-yellow flowers. Found at OSU wetland prairie. This flower is in a axillary cluster. The flowers parts include a calyx of 5 sepals, a zygomorphic corolla of 2 fused petals (banner), 1 separate petal (keel), and 2 separate petals (wings), an androecium of 9 stamen joined by their filaments with 1 stamen free, and a superior ovary with a unicarpellate gynoecium.

 

Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)
Ranunculaceae Family (Buttercup)
This primrose was found behind my parents’ house along the railroad tracks in Sandusky. The flowers have actinomorphic symmetry and an umbel inflorescence with determinate growth. The flower parts consist of a calyx of 3 to many sepals, a corolla of 0 to many petals, an androecium of many stamen, and a superior ovary that can be unicarpellous or apocarpellous.

 

Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)
Ranunculaceae Family (Buttercup)
This primrose was found behind my parents’ house along the railroad tracks in Sandusky. The flowers have actinomorphic symmetry and an umbel inflorescence with determinate growth. The flower parts consist of a calyx of 3 to many sepals, a corolla of 0 to many petals, an androecium of many stamen, and a superior ovary that can be unicarpellous or apocarpellous.